Vincent Scarsella Online

fiction author

Testimonials

Quotes Scarsella's "The Human Manifesto" By Daniel Liechty Posted on September 20 2011 Of Recent Interest? is The Human Manifesto: A General Plan for Human Survival, written by Vincent L. Scarsella (Mill City Press, 2009). Like many readers of this newsletter, Scarsella ran across Ernest Becker?s book, The Denial of Death, almost by accident. He read it, and has been wrestling with it in one way or another pretty much ever since. Over the years, he has been writing down his thoughts about the issues Becker?s work raises and in this book, he brings these thoughts together in systematic and very readable form. Scarsella recognizes that if Becker is right about human motivation, that it is largely driven by unconscious forces that emerge in the unrealistic quest to deny death and mortality, then we are faced with a tragic situation. If the lion?s share of what moves us is the push toward a goal that is for all intents and purposes not reality based, it can only be a matter of ti Quotes
Professor Dan Liechty
Ernest Becker Foundation

Quotes Scarsella, V.L. "The Cards of Unknown Players." Aethlon 18.1 (Fall 2000): 73-87. A man and his wheelchair-user son find a baseball card of a nonexistent player. This magical-realist story invokes Jorge Luis Borges, but its nearer inspiration is W.P. Kinsella. An original idea, strongly handled Quotes
Tim Morris - The University of Texas at Austin
Guide to Baseball Stories

Quotes "Scarsella spices [his tale] with saucy language when needed and street lingo where appropriate. He keeps the suspense at high level until the answers unfold." - The Buffalo New Quotes
The Buffalo News

Quotes "'The Anonymous Man' gets decent marks for creativity and intricacy...it's a fast read that runs through familiar local settings to a satisfying conclusion. Scarsella has the makings of a good storyteller...he and [Jack] Fox could go places." Quotes
The Buffalo News
Review of "The Anonymous Man"

Quotes Vincent Scarsella contributes "Vice Cop," a very enjoyable story depicting a society where sex is regulated while free love is considered illegal, thus requiring surveillance by a special squad of cops. [Review of Writings of the Fantastic, ed. John Grant]. Quotes
Mario Guslandi
The SF Site

Quotes This anthology [Dead Science] ends with two of the best zombie stories out there, and are the two best stories in this anthology. In "Homeless Zombies" by Vincent L. Scarsella, Don Kaminski hits an old favorite bar and sees an old friend, Joe Reed sitting at a table with a beer. The trouble is that Reed has died six months ago. "Homeless Zombies" is more dark fantasy than horror, and reads like a "Twilight Zone" married to a Matheson or Bradbury story. Kaminski tries to find out how Joe Reed can be walking around, living in his old house, and drinking beer in his old bar, but is also still dead. A great story with a twist ending that would have made Serling proud. Five stars. Quotes
Mark Louis Baumgarten
Reader of "Dead Science" Anthology - from Amazon reviews

Testimonials

  • ""Scarsella spices [his tale] with saucy language when needed and street lingo where appropriate. He keeps the suspense at high level until the answers unfold." - The Buffalo New"
    The Buffalo News
  • " "'The Anonymous Man' gets decent marks for creativity and intricacy...it's a fast read that runs through familiar local settings to a satisfying conclusion. Scarsella has the m..."
    The Buffalo News
    Review of "The Anonymous Man"